Generated with sparks and insights from 9 sources

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Introduction

  • Ambivalent sexism includes two sub-components: hostile sexism (HS) and benevolent sexism (BS).

  • Hostile sexism reflects overtly negative evaluations and stereotypes about a gender.

  • Benevolent sexism represents evaluations of gender that may appear subjectively positive but are damaging to gender equality.

  • Mitigation strategies include awareness campaigns, educational interventions, and promoting gender balance in decision-making.

  • Research and data gathering on sexism are crucial for developing effective mitigation strategies.

Definition [1]

  • Ambivalent sexism is a form of sexism that includes both hostile and benevolent attitudes.

  • The theory was developed by social psychologists Peter Glick and Susan Fiske in 1996.

  • Hostile sexism involves overtly negative evaluations and stereotypes about women.

  • Benevolent sexism involves seemingly positive evaluations that are actually damaging to gender equality.

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Components [1]

  • Hostile sexism (HS) reflects overtly negative evaluations and stereotypes about women.

  • Examples of HS include beliefs that women are incompetent, unintelligent, and overly emotional.

  • Benevolent sexism (BS) represents evaluations that may appear positive but are damaging.

  • Examples of BS include the belief that women need to be protected by men and should adhere to traditional gender roles.

  • Both forms of sexism reinforce traditional gender roles and patriarchal social structures.

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Impact [1]

  • Ambivalent sexism affects various aspects of society, including close relationships, workplace dynamics, and political behavior.

  • Hostile sexism is associated with acceptance of sexual harassment and intimate partner violence.

  • Benevolent sexism can hinder women's cognitive performance and professional evaluations.

  • Both forms of sexism contribute to the glass ceiling effect and gender-based wage differences.

  • Ambivalent sexism influences voting behavior and media representation of electoral candidates.

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Mitigation Strategies [1]

  • Implement awareness-raising campaigns to educate the public about sexism.

  • Promote gender balance in decision-making processes.

  • Develop educational interventions to reduce sexist attitudes.

  • Gather and analyze data on sexism to inform policy and interventions.

  • Encourage research on the effectiveness of different mitigation strategies.

Research Findings [1]

  • Research indicates that both men and women can endorse sexist beliefs about each other and themselves.

  • Hostile sexism is easier to identify as a form of prejudice compared to benevolent sexism.

  • Benevolent sexism can be seen as reinforcing the status quo and traditional gender roles.

  • Studies show that ambivalent sexism is not culturally specific and exists across different societies.

  • The Ambivalent Sexism Inventory (ASI) is a reliable and valid tool for measuring ambivalent sexist attitudes.

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Related Videos

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