Generated with sparks and insights from 15 sources

img6

img7

img8

img9

img10

img11

Introduction

  • Benevolent sexism is a form of sexism that appears subjectively positive but is actually harmful, idealizing women who conform to traditional gender roles.

  • Racial and ethnic differences in benevolent sexism have been underexplored, but recent studies have begun to address this gap.

  • Black American women tend to endorse benevolent sexism more than White American women.

  • Among Black American participants, benevolent and hostile sexism are not significantly correlated, unlike among White American participants.

  • The Ambivalent Sexism Inventory, commonly used to measure benevolent sexism, has poor measurement properties for Latinx and African American participants, suggesting it may not be appropriate for all racial or ethnic groups.

Definition and Components [1]

  • Benevolent sexism: Attitudes that seem positive but reinforce traditional gender roles and stereotypes.

  • Components: Protective paternalism, complementary gender differentiation, and heterosexual intimacy.

  • Protective paternalism: The belief that men should protect and provide for women.

  • Complementary gender differentiation: The idea that men and women have different but complementary roles.

  • Heterosexual intimacy: The belief that women are necessary to complete men.

img6

img7

img8

Measurement Issues [2]

  • Ambivalent Sexism Inventory: Commonly used to measure benevolent sexism.

  • Measurement properties: Poor for Latinx and African American participants.

  • Cultural context: Important to consider when assessing ambivalent sexism.

  • Validity: The inventory may not be appropriate for all racial or ethnic groups.

  • Need for new tools: To better assess benevolent sexism across diverse populations.

img6

img7

img8

img9

Racial and Ethnic Variations [2]

  • Black American women: Endorse benevolent sexism more than White American women.

  • Correlation: Benevolent and hostile sexism are not significantly correlated among Black American participants.

  • Gender differences: No significant gender difference in endorsement among Black American participants.

  • Cultural context: Important to understand the drivers of sexism.

  • Need for research: More studies needed to explore these variations.

img6

Predictors of Benevolent Sexism [1]

  • Traditional gender roles: Higher endorsement among individuals in traditional roles.

  • Religiosity: Positively associated with benevolent sexism across various religious affiliations.

  • Political conservatism: Strong predictor of ambivalent sexism.

  • Fear of crime: Enhances women's endorsement of benevolent sexism.

  • Security needs: Men’s benevolent sexism increases with anxiety about manhood or romantic relationships.

img6

img7

img8

img9

Implications and Consequences [1]

  • Gender roles: Benevolent sexism reinforces traditional gender roles.

  • Perception: Benevolent sexism is often seen as less objectionable than hostile sexism.

  • Protection: Offers perceived benefits like protection and financial security.

  • System justification: Women who endorse benevolent sexism see the social system as fair.

  • Life satisfaction: Associated with greater life satisfaction among women who endorse it.

img6

img7

img8

img9

img10

Related Videos

<br><br>

<div class="-md-ext-youtube-widget"> { "title": "Benevolent Sexism presentation video", "link": "https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TulAkXvqP6s", "channel": { "name": ""}, "published_date": "May 11, 2020", "length": "" }</div>

<div class="-md-ext-youtube-widget"> { "title": "Forms of Sexism (Old-fashioned, Modern, & Ambivalent Sexism)", "link": "https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7ylUhAtapzM", "channel": { "name": ""}, "published_date": "Jul 22, 2021", "length": "" }</div>