Generated with sparks and insights from 14 sources

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Introduction

  • Benevolent sexism is a form of sexism that appears subjectively positive but is actually harmful.

  • Situational factors play a significant role in the endorsement of benevolent sexism.

  • Traditional gender roles and circumstances that reflect these roles increase benevolent sexism scores.

  • Having more children is associated with stronger endorsement of benevolent sexism.

  • Religiosity and political conservatism are ideological factors that drive benevolent sexism.

  • Fear of crime and disease can increase benevolent sexism as it offers a sense of security.

  • Men's benevolent sexism increases when they feel anxious about their sense of manhood or romantic relationships.

Definition [1]

  • Benevolent sexism: A form of sexism that appears positive but is harmful.

  • Ambivalent sexism: Includes both hostile and benevolent sexism.

  • Hostile sexism: Overtly negative attitudes towards women.

  • Benevolent sexism: Subjectively positive attitudes that reinforce traditional gender roles.

  • Ambivalent Sexism Inventory: Tool used to measure both hostile and benevolent sexism.

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Traditional Gender Roles [1]

  • Traditional gender roles: Situations reflecting these roles increase benevolent sexism.

  • Having more children: Predicts stronger endorsement of benevolent sexism.

  • Gender roles: Men as protectors and women as nurturers.

  • Endorsement: People justify traditional roles through benevolent sexism.

  • Changes in roles: Increases in same-sex parenting and men's participation in childcare may reduce benevolent sexism.

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Ideological Factors [1]

  • Religiosity: Positively associated with benevolent sexism.

  • Political conservatism: Explains more variance in ambivalent sexism than gender.

  • Right-wing authoritarianism: Predicts benevolent sexism.

  • Social dominance orientation: Predicts hostile sexism.

  • Religious priming: Increases endorsement of benevolent sexism.

Fear and Security [1]

  • Fear of crime: Enhances women's endorsement of benevolent sexism.

  • Fear of disease: Increases benevolent sexism as it offers protection.

  • Men's anxiety: Increases benevolent sexism when anxious about manhood or romantic relationships.

  • Security needs: Drive benevolent sexism.

  • COVID-19 pandemic: Fear of disease may have led to increases in benevolent sexism.

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Impact on Men [1]

  • Men's benevolent sexism: Increases with anxiety about manhood or romantic relationships.

  • Attachment avoidance: Men with this tendency report low benevolent and high hostile sexism.

  • Security needs: Men endorse benevolent sexism to feel secure.

  • Romantic relationships: Influence men's endorsement of benevolent sexism.

  • Manhood anxiety: Drives benevolent sexism.

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Related Videos

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<div class="-md-ext-youtube-widget"> { "title": "Benevolent Sexism presentation video", "link": "https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TulAkXvqP6s", "channel": { "name": ""}, "published_date": "May 11, 2020", "length": "" }</div>

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