Generated with sparks and insights from 10 sources

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Introduction

  • Location: The MOK (Machine Owner Key) list is stored in the NVRAM (Non-Volatile RAM) of your computer.

  • Access: NVRAM is a type of memory that retains data even when the computer is turned off, and it is managed by the BIOS or UEFI firmware.

  • Purpose: The MOK list is used to augment the UEFI Secure Boot key database, allowing the system to trust additional keys specified by the user.

  • Management: Tools like 'mokutil' can be used to manage the MOK list, including enrolling new keys or viewing existing ones.

  • Security: MOK keys are used to validate components during the boot process, ensuring that only trusted binaries are executed.

What is MOK? [1]

  • Definition: MOK stands for Machine Owner Key.

  • Function: It is a key that the system owner trusts and can use to validate components during the boot process.

  • Cryptography: MOK uses public key cryptography, involving a key pair for signing and validation.

  • Integration: MOK is integrated with the UEFI Secure Boot mechanism to enhance security.

  • Storage: MOK keys are stored in NVRAM, a type of non-volatile memory.

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Purpose of MOK [2]

  • Augmentation: MOK augments the UEFI Secure Boot key database.

  • Trust: It allows the system to trust additional keys specified by the user.

  • Validation: MOK keys can be used to validate custom kernels and other binaries.

  • Control: Provides users with better control over which modules can be loaded during boot.

  • Security: Enhances the security of the boot process by ensuring only trusted binaries are executed.

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Managing MOK [3]

  • Tool: 'mokutil' is a common tool used for managing MOK keys.

  • Enrollment: Users can enroll new keys using the 'Enroll MOK' option.

  • Viewing: Existing keys in the MOK list can be viewed and confirmed.

  • Commands: Commands like 'mokutil --import' and 'mokutil --list-new' are used for key management.

  • Interface: The MOK management interface is typically accessed during the boot process.

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Enrolling MOK [4]

  • Process: Enrolling a MOK involves creating a key pair and signing the desired binaries.

  • Command: The 'mokutil --import' command is used to import new keys.

  • Password: A one-time password is required during the enrollment process.

  • Confirmation: The key will be prompted for confirmation on the next boot.

  • Usage: Enrolled MOK keys can be used to sign custom kernels and other binaries.

Security Implications [5]

  • Trust: MOK keys allow the system to trust additional binaries specified by the user.

  • Control: Provides users with control over which modules can be loaded during boot.

  • Validation: Ensures that only trusted binaries are executed during the boot process.

  • Customization: Allows users to validate custom kernels and other components.

  • Security: Enhances the overall security of the boot process by integrating with UEFI Secure Boot.

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